Massachusetts Senate Candidates for Senator, MA Election Race 2014

Massachusetts Senatorial Candidates
Massachusetts Candidates for Congress

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State Primary on September 9, 2014

Massachusetts Senator

Ed Markey (D)
Frank Addivinola (R)
Brian Herr (R)
Bruce Skarin (Independent)

Massachusetts Candidates for US Congress from MA

Massachusetts Congress Candidates
Massachusetts Congressional Candidates

District 1:
Richard Neal (D)

District 2:
Jim McGovern (D)
Dan Dubrule (R)

District 3:
Niki Tsongas (D)

District 4:
Joe Kennedy III (D)

District 5:
Katherine Clark (D)
James Aulenti (Independent)
Jim Hall (Independent)
Bill Wilt (Independent)

District 6:
John Tierney (D)
Marisa DeFranco (D)
John Devine (D)
Seth Moulton (D)
Richard Tisei (R)

District 7:
Mike Capuano (D)
J.P. Lowenthal (Green-Rainbow)

District 8:
Stephen Lynch (D)

District 9:
Bill Keating (D)
Mark Alliegro (R) - Tea Party Activist
John Chapman (R)
Vincent Cogliano Jr. (R)
Dan Shores (R)

News about the Massachusetts Governors Election 2014

The three Republican contenders for Massachusetts open U.S. Senate seat largely agreed on policy issues in their first debate on Tuesday, including opposing any ban on the sale of assault rifles. Former U.S. Attorney Michael Sullivan, state Representative Daniel Winslow and private equity executive and former Navy SEAL Gabriel Gomez largely agreed on the policy questions in their first match-up before the April 30 primary for the Massachusetts Senator Election Race.

All three said they opposed any ban on assault rifles, the sort of weapon used in the December massacre at a Connecticut primary school. "The fact of the matter is that people like to think that bans are effective. They are completely ineffective. I've seen it form my experience," said Sullivan, who a recent University of Massachusetts Lowell-Boston Herald poll showed as leading the Republican field. "Reducing gun violence is not about taking guns out of the hands of citizens ... it's about getting them out of the hands of problem persons."

The trio face an uphill battle in liberal-leaning Massachusetts, where polls show Democrats with a strong lead ahead of the June 25 special election for the seat, which became available when John Kerry was named secretary of state. Massachusetts Senate Candidate Senator Gomez, a political newcomer, said that senators should be limited to two six-year terms in office.

All three said they would not evaluate potential nominees to the Supreme Court based on the nominee's opinion of abortion rights. In the state's last special Senate election three years ago, Republican Scott Brown stunned the liberal establishment by winning the seat that liberal lion Edward M. Kennedy held for almost a half-century. But in this match up, all three Republicans trail U.S. Representative Edward Markey, a Democrat, who also holds a lead over fellow Democratic Congressman Stephen Lynch, according to last week's UMass-Herald poll. Pollsters caution that all five candidates had relatively low name recognition among likely voters, meaning that the lead could easily change. In this Election Race for Massachusetts 2014, a Republican victory could help the party's effort to retake a majority in the Senate, where it holds 45 seats. Democrats have 53 seats, and there are two independents.

In January, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick named his former chief of staff, William Cowan, as interim senator. Cowan is not running for the Election Race for Massachusetts 2014 seat.

History of Massachusetts. Information that every Massachusetts Election Candidates for US Senate Should Know:

Religious dissident Roger Williams is banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony by the General Court of Massachusetts. Williams had spoken out against the right of civil authorities to punish religious dissension and to confiscate Indian land.

After leaving Massachusetts, Williams, with the assistance of the Narragansett tribe, established a settlement at the junction of two rivers near Narragansett Bay, located in present-day Rhode Island. He declared the settlement open to all those seeking freedom of conscience and the removal of the church from civil matters, and many dissatisfied Puritans came. Taking the success of the venture as a sign from God, Williams named the community "Providence."

Among those who found a haven in the religious and political refuge of the Rhode Island Colony were Anne Hutchinson--like Williams, she had been exiled from Massachusetts for religious reasons--some of the first Jews to settle in North America, and the Quakers. In Providence, Roger Williams also founded the first Baptist church in America and edited the first dictionary of Native-American languages.